iCare: Psychoeducation for parents of children

Approximately, 11,000 self-harm episodes occur on a yearly basis in Denmark. Of these, the majority are among youth below the age of 25 years. The Suicide Prevention Clinics experience that parents often request information on how they can best help their child after a self-harm episode. The aim of this project is to 1) in collaboration with parents to develop a webpage for this group, 2) to test whether the webpage can help reduce the stress burden that parents experience in a randomised trial, 3) to examine whether parents of children who self-harm have a higher rate of stress-related response when compared to parents not exposed. The project has received 3.7 DKR from the Danish TRYG Foundation

DRISP: Jette Louise Skovgaard Larsen, Anette Juel Kynde, Britt Morthorst, Annette Erlangsen


Partners

  • Elene Fleischer, PhD Netværk for selvmordsramte (www.nefos.dk)
  • Niels Buus, Mental Health Nursing, Sydney Nursing School, University of Sydney
  • Jan-Henrik Winsløw, Enhed for Selvmordsforebyggelse, Region Nordjylland
  • Prof Keith Hawton, Centre for Suicide Research, University of Oxford

Self-help Online against Suicidal Thoughts

In the Self-help Online against Suicide thoughts (SOS-project) we investigated the effectiveness of a semi-guided Internet-based self-help program, which aimed to reduce suicidal thoughts.
A total of 402 people with suicide thoughts were recruited over a two-year period and the results will be published in 2020. The project is funded by TrygFonden and carried out in collaboration with the Danish Lifeline.

DRISP: Charlotte Mühlmann, Trine Madsen, Annette Erlangsen, Merete Nordentoft

Partner:

  • Livslinien

Managing suicidality in research on internet- and mobile-based interventions: current practice and recommendations

Many studies on internet-based therapy exclude participants with suicide thoughts. The aim of two studies is to provide an overview of the current practice in the management of suicidality in RCTs of internet interventions for depression and suicide thoughts. Researchers in the field have been found through a literature review and been asked to answer a questionnaire and be interviewed regarding their practices. Based on this overview, best-practice recommendations regarding how to manage suicidality in research on internet interventions for depression was published in 2020.

For more information read https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0165032719323353.

DRISP: Charlotte Mühlmann


Partners:

  • Institute of Psychology, University of Freiburg
  • Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health

MYPLAN – a self-help tool for management of crisis

People who have had a suicide attempt have a significantly higher risk of repeated suicidal behaviour. MYPLAN was created with the intention of being a self-help tool for management of suicidal crisis. This project consists of 1) a qualitative study of stakeholders on improvements to MYPLAN; 2) a randomized clinical trial to evaluate MYPLAN’s efficacy in reducing suicide intent among persons at risk of suicide, and 3) a person-centered evaluation of the MYPLAN to identify barriers and facilitators to its general implementation. The RCT was initiated in 2019 and is currently ongoing. Following studies have been published :
The project received support from the Danish TRYG Foundation.

Publications

https://trialsjournal.biomedcentral.com
https://www.tandfonline.com


DRISP: Charlotte Mühlmann Kate Andreassen Aamund, Jette Louise S. Larsen, Annette Erlangsen

Partners:

  • Hanne Frandsen, Mental Health Centre Copenhagen, Region H
  • Niels Buus, Mental Health Nursing, Sydney Nursing School, University of Sydney, Australia

TEENS trial

Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is very prevalent among adolescents estimated to a lifetime prevalence in non-clinical samples of 17%; increasing in psychiatric populations. NSSI an important predictor of later suicidal behavior. Evidence for treatment is spares but internet-based interventions guided by a therapist have been suggested. We aim to investigate the effect of internet-based ERITA compared to weekly journaling as add-on to treatment as usual in 13-17-year-old patients with NSSI referred to child– and adolescent mental health services. This pilot feasibility study (n=25) is an RCT. The experimental interventions are add-on to treatment as usual. Primary outcome is the frequency of NSSI assessed after 12 weeks. Also, adherence to treatment will be assessed.

DRISP: Britt Morthorst

Partners:

  • Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services in the Capital Region of Denmark
  • Johan Bjureberg, PhD, Karolinska Instituttet, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Clara Hellner, MD, PhD, Karolinska Instituttet, Stockholm, Sweden

Joinpoint regression analysis of suicides in Denmark during 1980-2015


Is the suicide rate in Denmark increasing or decreasing? Effective suicide prevention requires vigilant monitoring of suicide trends. The aim of this study was to assess the change in the Danish suicide rate over time using joinpoint regression analysis. The suicide rate fell sharply between 1980 and 1999 in Denmark, but since then the decrease has been modest, especially since 2007. Further reduction in the suicide rate requires new and effective measures. The study is published in Danish Medical Bulletin

DRISP: Susanne Dyvesether, Annette Erlangsen & Merete Nordentoft


Partners:

  • Julie L Forman, Section of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark